EXERCISE-INDUCED MIGRAINES

Health and exercise are all the fad these days and maybe rightly so. Home exercise was what kept a lot of people sane during the almost year-long home quarantine, but now that restrictions are easing up and gyms are back in business, gym rats are heading back to their usual happy place.

Picture this. You’re lying down on the bench doing your second set of bench press when all of a sudden you feel a throbbing pain across your forehead. Does this sound familiar? Have you ever experienced this? This is a familiar scene at the gym and a lot of people may dismiss it as just being a bit under the weather, but this is actually a condition called exercise-induced migraine. Some activities associated with exercise-induced migraines include running, rowing, tennis, swimming and weight lifting.

What is a migraine?

A migraine is a headache disorder characterized by moderate to intense throbbing pain, nausea and heightened sensitivity to external stimuli or environment.

Although the reason is unclear, movement often triggers migraines. Movements such as rotating your body quickly, turning your head suddenly, or even bending over can cause or aggravate migraine symptoms.

Risk Factors and Prevention

Women experience migraines three times more than men and it occurs mostly on adults between the ages of 25-55. People with a family history of migraine headaches are also more likely to experience migraines.

The best treatment for migraines is to stop them before they even start. If exercise is one of your triggers, there’s no need to be drastic and stop exercising altogether. Just remember that exercise-induced migraines are more likely to occur in these situations – hot, humid weather or high altitudes.

Consider working out in an air-conditioned room or later in the afternoon when the temperature is generally cooler. Maintain proper hydration with a water bottle always within reach.

When to see a doctor

If you consistently experience exercise-induced migraines, it’s time to consult your doctor.

Sources:

www.healthline.com

www.webmd.com

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